BlackBerry Experience Suite Introduced for Android, iOS and Windows Phone

BlackBerry-Experience-Suite-Cross-Platform-Introduced-for-Android-iOS-and-Windows-Phone

BlackBerry Messenger has been for a long time a BlackBerry-only affair. However, since the Canadian company started to have big problems due to its lack of innovation on the smartphone business, it has started to look for opportunities to widen its software footprint in the market.

The best selling product made by BlackBerry is now BBM, an instant messenger that’s now available on all major operating systems, including Android, iOS and Windows Phone.

Next Browser for Android mashes up its rivals’ greatest hits (video)

go-launcher-next-browser

When few (if any) web browsers do everything well, many of us have more than one client just to cover all the bases. The GO Launcher Dev Team’s just-launched Next Browser for Android tries to solve this in the simplest way possible: it cherry picks features from established rivals. Sharing extensions from Dolphin? Check. Chrome’s frequently visited pages? Check. Speed Dial from Opera? Check.

There’s even a Flipboard-style RSS reader. As there’s also bookmark syncing and voice search, Next Browser is theoretically the only client that Android users could want. How well that pastiche works is another matter, but those who’ve been pining for an all-encompassing browser can give the new app a try at the source link.

Google Glass gets a one-stop shop for downloads, including a rooted image

google-glass-box-340

Early Google Glass owners are dominated by developers and tinkerers, so it’s only fair that they get easy access to the downloads they need. Appropriately, Google has quietly set up a page that centralizes both Glass images and kernel source code.

The company has even saved owners from having to hack their eyewear the hard way — one image comes pre-rooted for those willing to toss caution (and their warranties) to the wind. Most of us can’t take advantage of these downloads for about a year or more, but those with early access can swing by the new code hub today.

Samsung Galaxy S 4 official: 5-inch 1080p display, Octa-core Exynos chip and 13MP camera

samsunggs4-eng

Another year, another Galaxy S flagship smartphone from Samsung. 2013’s version of the crown jewel, the Galaxy S 4, has just been officially announced at its Unpacked event. Since we know you’re dying to find out what’s new, let’s dive straight into the details. The GS 4 features a 5-inch 1080p (1,920 x 1,080) Super AMOLED panel which offers a pixel density of 441 ppi. It’s also a powerful beast: it packs 2GB RAM and will come with either a 1.6GHz Exynos Octa-core chip or a 1.9GHz quad-core Qualcomm, depending on your region. (Unfortunately, Samsung hasn’t yet specified which Snapdragon we can expect, but we’re guessing it’s at least a 600 if not an 800.) Refreshingly, it will also come with Android 4.2.2 on-board when it launches.

Dimension-wise, the GS 4 is 136.6 x 69.8 x 7.9mm (5.38 x 2.75 x 0.31 inch) and weighs 130g (4.59 ounces). The chassis itself is actually 0.8mm skinnier, 0.7mm thinner and 3g lighter than its predecessor, which is impressive given its larger screen size and 2,600mAh battery. It will launch in black and white hues, though Samsung plans to add more colors to its lineup as the year progresses. Head below the break as we continue to reveal what else you can expect from the newest Galaxy device.

doubleTwist takes on Pandora with Magic Radio subscription service

3-12-2013doubletwist2

Remember doubleTwist? (Probably almost as well as you remember India.Arie and Nikka Costa, but more on that later.) The player made a bit of a name for itself in the pre-Play Music days — based as much on the default Android music app’s shortcomings as its own strengths. Over the years, as the need for a third-party media manager has waned, doubleTwist has fought to remain relevant by piling on features.

To its own detriment, however, many of them remain premium options, like the ability to download missing album art for $5. The latest offering to bring some much appreciated functionality attached to a rather undesirable price tag is Magic Radio. This is doubleTwist’s attempt to take on Pandora with a streaming music discovery service that’s supposed to help you find the music “you love.” For $4 a month…

HTC One review (2013)

htcone620340-1363098027

One. In literal terms, it’s a number. To HTC, however, it’s a branding strategy — the foundation upon which the entire company is now based. Just take one look at the One lineup and you’ll easily understand this is the manufacturer’s pride and joy. There’s a very good reason for that: in a crowded smartphone market, HTC is the underdog to titans like Samsung and Apple. The company needs to stand out if it even wants the chance to prove itself to consumers.

Last year’s One X marked a solid start, and while it didn’t pick up the momentum CEO Peter Chou would’ve liked, the follow-up model — simply called the One — takes HTC’s design and imaging chops to the next level, bringing a new UltraPixel camera sensor, among other top-shelf specs. But will it catch the eye of potential smartphone buyers, in light of another key product announcement? We’d say it’s got more than a fighting chance.

Inside the Apple-Google War: It’s Personal

18mp9p3324lk8jpg

The New York Times has a long, juicy look at what’s been going on behind the scenes with the ever-escalating conflict between Google and Apple. The cause for all the enmity, according to insiders? Ego.

When Apple filed suit against HTC earlier this month, it was clear that Google and Apple’s romance had turned sour. But the Times’ article, which draws on “interviews with two dozen industry watchers, Silicon Valley investors and current and former employees at both companies,” offers a sense of just how personal this battle is and always has been. The writers begin by summarizing:

Samsung unveils new smart phone with own software

Wireless Show Samsung

Samsung Electronics Co., the largest maker of cell phones for the U.S. market, on Sunday revealed the first phone running Samsung’s own “smart” software system, bada. With bada, Korea-based Samsung is taking the TouchWiz system used on its touch-screen non-smart phones and making it the basis of a smart phone platform to take on Apple Inc.’s iPhone and Research In Motion Ltd.’s BlackBerry. Samsung also makes phones based on other competing smart phone systems: Android, created by Google Inc., and Symbian, of which Nokia Corp. is a major backer.

J.K. Shin, the president of Samsung’s phone division, said the goal of bada was to expand the market for smart phones, making them available to people across the world who have made do with non-smart phones. The new phone, dubbed the Wave, is a touch screen phone like the iPhone. It features a highly saturated, high-resolution screen using organic light emitting diodes, or OLEDs.