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Apple continues to dominate smartphone sales with their flagship iPhone 5s and mid-range iPhone 5c as the handsets took two of the top three sales slots at every major U.S. wireless carrier for the third month in a row.

The Cupertino, Calif.-based company remained America’s top smartphone vendor in November on the back of ‘strong’ iPhone 5s sales and ‘steady’ iPhone 5c sales, according to data cited by Canaccord Genuity analyst T. Michael Walkley in a Thursday note to investors. Samsung notched a second-place finish in an industry that has seen major sales consolidation throughout the fourth quarter.

Before the iPhone 5s and 5c’s release, Apple, Samsung, HTC, Nokia, Sony, and Motorola all had handsets enjoying top-three sales at at least one of America’s big four carriers. Apple’s September announcement pushed all but Samsung out of the picture and relegated the South Korean conglomerate’s Galaxy S4 to the runner-up position across the board. Read the rest of this entry »


iphone5c-cases-lead

Welcome to the drama, the dilemmas, the sheer disbelief involved in picking accessories to go with your new iPhone. (Yes, an official 30-pin to Lightning adapter really costs that much). We can’t promise to make the choices easy, but we can at least give you a glimpse of some of the bumpers and functional extras that Apple has revealed today, and link you up to the relevant pages on Apple’s store (see the Source links below).

Starting with the iPhone 5c, it’s “unapologetically” plastic to start with, of course, but you can give it extra protection with an additional, colorful mesh-style plastic case. This costs $29 and comes in the same five colors as the phone itself, so you can either match the phone or mix it up with a secondary color. There’s also a black option if you want to tone things down a bit. One more thing: the iPhone 5c gets it’s own Lightning dock, which comes in plain white and costs $29. Read the rest of this entry »


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It’s an age-old problem: do we clamor for a company to ship a product that’s not ready, or do we swallow delays with grace as it aims to deliver when things are good and ready? Such a choice has to be made when it comes to Automatic, the California-based startup which had originally hoped to start shipping its automotive dongle + app platform at the end of this month.

Those (including yours truly) who pre-ordered on day one received an email last night delivering the news that things were running a bit behind schedule. The hardware itself is actually already being manufactured, but stellar components are only a piece of the total puzzle. The software — an iPhone app, in this instance — still needs more time in the proverbial oven, and now we’re being told that packages won’t ship until “the end of August.”

A three-month hiccup is nothing to scoff at, and Automatic seemingly knows it. In order to sate those who were hoping to use the $70 product during their upcoming summer road trips, the company is giving early pre-orderers the option to beta test the app as it stands today. Read the rest of this entry »


How to Turn Your iPod touch into an iPhone: 4G Edition

  • Author: admin
  • Filed under: Apple
  • Date: Oct 28,2010

The latest iPhone and iPod touch are nearly identical devices, ignoring the pesky reality that the latter isn’t a phone. We can fix that. Here’s how to turn your iPod touch into a viable (and cheaper) iPhone alternative out of the box.

Back in the day, turning your iPod touch into an iPhone required a jailbreak, but now, thanks to some wonderful apps and other tools, using your iPod touch as an iPhone alternative is a piece of cake. Read the rest of this entry »


10 iPhone Apps to Help You Survive the Holidays

Sometimes going home for the holidays can be a case of collective insanity. I tend to fly on the big travel days when the airport security lines are ridiculously long, my flight is more expensive, and my family is more stressed than normal.

This year, I plan to use my iPhone as a problem solver for all my holiday woes. From traveling, to shopping, to entertaining the kiddies, these iPhone apps cover everything but those family fights (even the iPhone’s not that miraculous!). Read the rest of this entry »


HTC

In an interview with T3, HTC’s Chief Innovation Officer Horace Luke justifies the impressive Teflon coating on the HTC Hero by saying that the iPhone is slippery as hell. The obvious solution, of course, is seedless watermelons.

He also says that there are three “classes” of Android phone. Obviously HTC isn’t happy with Android as is, and will skin it like they do with Windows mobile.

There are three classes of Android phone: the first was the Google-branded phones, the G1 and Magic; the Hero is the first in the second category, in which we added our own customised UI, but we didn’t change everything because they did some great things, like push email, integrating Google Maps etc; and the third is the quick and dirty Chinese knockoffs that won’t work with Marketplace. They’re Linux phones, really.


21 coolest apps for the Apple iPhone

  • Author: admin
  • Filed under: Apple
  • Date: Jan 12,2009

So, you’ve got a gleaming new iPhone 3G. After you make a few calls to tell your friends, snap a few pictures, and try out the Web browser, it’s time to load that thing up with software. After all, this device lets you go way beyond the usual calling, texting, and surfing.

Apple’s communicator extraordinaire knows how it’s moving in space, can tell where it is on the planet, and lets you control it with multi-finger gestures. Few desktop computers give programmers as many possibilities, and developers have responded with hundreds of applications. The 21 apps we’ve collected here will transform your new device into far more than a phone. Read the rest of this entry »


“iPhone Killers” gird their loins for battle

As the launch of the 3G iPhone approaches, BusinessWeek reports that competitors face the same problem they did in July of last year.

“Most people want the iPhone, just as they want the iPod and not some other MP3 player,” says Gloria Barczak, professor of marketing at Northeastern University. “People want the real thing.”

The difference between now and then is that the real thing will cost less, at least up front. Higher costs for data plans and messaging actually means the 3G iPhone costs more over the life of the contract with AT&T.

Nonetheless, that new sticker price is putting pressure on rival carriers “to increase their own mobile handset subsidies, boost marketing budgets, and reduce prices on some services, analysts and industry insiders say—all likely to mean slimmer margins.”

Unfortunately, none of those business strategies are about the product and the user experience, which leaves it up to the handset makers to challenge the iPhone.

“We want to take the touch experience to a new level,” says John Wang, chief marketing officer of HTC. The Touch has sold more than 3 million units worldwide in the past year, which sounds great until you consider the iPhone has sold twice that many in the same period while limited to just a few countries.

Still, the Touch has sold more than the Centro. Palm’s last gasp has sold more than a million since its introduction in 2007, and the company is “confident” of reaching 2 million in 2008. Imagine what Palm could do if it actually created something new, instead of beating their dead horse of an OS at $99 a phone. Or maybe that’s not such a good idea.

The Sprint Instinct is new, though one could question its originality, at least in advertising. Sprint is spending $100 million in ads that compare the Instinct to the iPhone—the 2G iPhone, that is. Looking over reviews, they are mixed at best. At worst, Gizmodo lambastes web browsing on the Instinct as an “ABYSMAL failure of design.”

And regarding failures of design at web browsing, one could count the Blackberry firmly in that column, at least until the soon-to-be-released Blackberry Bold. Preliminary reports have a lot of good things to say about what will be the iPhone’s real competition among consumers, but that brings up the real question.

Carriers and handset makers had an entire year to get ahead of the iPhone, to create a true rival at a cheaper price. Now, a year later, they don’t even have the better sticker price.

Maybe you can’t beat the real iThing.

Source: Arstechnica.com