What’s the Difference: HTC One M9 vs HTC One M8

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As you probably know, an hour ago HTC just announced its latest flagship smartphone in Barcelona at MWC 2015, which it is calling the M9.

Naturally, you’re probably wondering if the new handset is worth putting your HTC One M8 in a box and forgetting all about it. So, is the new HTC One M9 worth upgrading or is it just a new, shiny toy, the Taiwanese company is hoping to lure you in with?

HTC One review (2013)

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One. In literal terms, it’s a number. To HTC, however, it’s a branding strategy — the foundation upon which the entire company is now based. Just take one look at the One lineup and you’ll easily understand this is the manufacturer’s pride and joy. There’s a very good reason for that: in a crowded smartphone market, HTC is the underdog to titans like Samsung and Apple. The company needs to stand out if it even wants the chance to prove itself to consumers.

Last year’s One X marked a solid start, and while it didn’t pick up the momentum CEO Peter Chou would’ve liked, the follow-up model — simply called the One — takes HTC’s design and imaging chops to the next level, bringing a new UltraPixel camera sensor, among other top-shelf specs. But will it catch the eye of potential smartphone buyers, in light of another key product announcement? We’d say it’s got more than a fighting chance.

Inside the Apple-Google War: It’s Personal

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The New York Times has a long, juicy look at what’s been going on behind the scenes with the ever-escalating conflict between Google and Apple. The cause for all the enmity, according to insiders? Ego.

When Apple filed suit against HTC earlier this month, it was clear that Google and Apple’s romance had turned sour. But the Times’ article, which draws on “interviews with two dozen industry watchers, Silicon Valley investors and current and former employees at both companies,” offers a sense of just how personal this battle is and always has been. The writers begin by summarizing:

HTC’s Chief Innovator: ‘The iPhone is Slippery Like a Watermelon Seed’

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In an interview with T3, HTC’s Chief Innovation Officer Horace Luke justifies the impressive Teflon coating on the HTC Hero by saying that the iPhone is slippery as hell. The obvious solution, of course, is seedless watermelons.

He also says that there are three “classes” of Android phone. Obviously HTC isn’t happy with Android as is, and will skin it like they do with Windows mobile.

There are three classes of Android phone: the first was the Google-branded phones, the G1 and Magic; the Hero is the first in the second category, in which we added our own customised UI, but we didn’t change everything because they did some great things, like push email, integrating Google Maps etc; and the third is the quick and dirty Chinese knockoffs that won’t work with Marketplace. They’re Linux phones, really.