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Talk about specialised: the Asahi Beerbot aka the Robocco

Looking like a mix between good ol’ R2D2, a lamp and a golf ball, here comes the Robocco from Asahi.
As you might have guessed from the title, this robot’s only task is related to beer: it should take one out of its belly, open it, and pour it in a mug. And this is what it does.

Initially only available as a prize for a contest, it is now on sale at CScout Japan.

It can hold a sixpack (of standard cans) in its refrigerating belly.
At the press of a button, a can will be lifted, opened and poured into the mug.
The whole operation will be accompanied by incessant nagging and lots of text on its display.

Click on for some more data and for a video of it in action.

The ‘used, but in perfect condition’ robots are available for $800 (add $100 for insured delivery). The price is steep, for a device that only does one thing (and it doesn’t even do it good), but think of how rare it is.

Here are some features:

  1. can be loaded with 6 cans
  2. programmable voices (really, the one in the video is SO annoying)
  3. child protection (funny, this whole robot is here to cater for your inner child)
  4. auto-cleaning mode

You’ll see by the length of the video that it takes an eternity to get your beer poured. As if this wasn’t enough, the operation is accompanied by robot sounds, lights and that incessant voice.. And to top all of it, the beer will get a huge head.

No, not good.. I’d rather see the beer launching fridge available for sale.

SteriPen Adventurer

Product Description
New for 2007! At a mere 4 ounces, the SteriPEN Adventurer water purifier is ideal for backcountry hiking and camping trips. Utilizing the same technology used to purify water in municipal treatment facilities, hospitals and water-bottling plants, the Adventurer destroys viruses, bacteria and cysts, including Giardia and Cryptosporidium, by using high-energy Ultraviolet (UV) light. The Adventurer is easy to operate and purifies water quickly and efficiently without the need for chemicals or pumping. The Adventurer makes purifying water a cinch. Simply fill a 16 oz. or 32 oz. glass, plastic, ceramic or metal container with clear water, push the activation button once for 32 oz. or twice for 16 oz., dip it in the container and stir slightly to agitate the water. Ultraviolet light is invisible to the human eye, but a visible blue light indicates that the Adventurer is working and shuts off as soon as a full dose has been delivered. The Adventurer purifies 16 oz. of water in 48 seconds and 32 oz. in 90 seconds! The UV light breaks down the DNA of viruses, bacteria and cysts, rendering them harmless. Because the penetration of UV light can be limited by discoloration, solids and debris, it is important that clear, unfrozen water be used. The SteriPEN Water Bottle Pre-Filter (sold separately) can be employed to filter particulate-filled water before UV treatment takes place. The Adventurer is powered by two CR123 rechargeable batteries (included). The Adventurer’s electronics are designed to activate only as long as there is enough battery power available to produce the required UV dosage, so there is no risk of an inadequate dose as batteries run low.

$109.95
Buy it HERE

LG KU-580 Google Phone


LG KU-580, it features Google Search, Google Mail and Google Map. The phone was created as a collaboration between LG and Google. It features LG Chocolate black n red style, along with 2 inch widescreen display, 3G, FM Radio, Mp3 player and more.

The Google phone is now available in France and Italy. German and other European countries should have it soon. Base on what I can tell from the pictures, Vodafone will be the carrier.

Future Sonics Atrio M5 gets reviewed by Gear Diary and ABI

 

Both AnythingButIpod and Gear Diary had a chance to check out Future Sonics latest earphones the Atrio M5.

The Future Sonics Atrio m5s are an impressive set of earphones. I found them to be some of the most comfortable I have ever tried, and the sound produced was distinctly impressive. Let’s face it, $200 is a lot to plunk down on a set of earphones. But if the sound coming out of your player is really important to you, then making this particular sacrifice will be easily justified.

GearDiary.com

Without a doubt, the Future Sonics Atrios are my favorite in-ear monitors at the moment. No other IEMs I know of do so much right and so little wrong. They’re not the most “pedantic” phones out there, but they’re the most musical ones for my tastes. Almost like good full-sized headphones, they make the sound really enjoyable, and they get my feet tapping – no matter what style of music I’m listening to. They are punchy and precise without being fatiguing, they are quite spacious and still isolate a lot. The Future Sonics Atrio M5 are not the cheapest in-ear monitors around, but they’re far from being the most expensive ones you can find. They’re worth every penny, and they give the double/triple/quadruple balanced armature IEMs a run for their money. Highly recommended for people who love to listen to the music instead of analyzing single sine waves.

Logitech Cordless Precision for PlayStation 3 brings the rumble, forgets the motion

Why Logitech decided to eschew a “next-gen” feature for a “” one in its newest PS3 controller we’ll never know, but the esteemed peripherals manufacturer is nonetheless poised to loose its rumble-tastic, accelerometer-free Cordless Precision for PlayStation 3 on the gaming world.

IGN got a first look at the SIXAXIS competitor, and while they appreciate the build quality, battery life, and solid wireless connection, the lack of motion sensing, crappy D-pad, and absence of Bluetooth-related functionality (the Precision requires a USB dongle to communicate with the console) aren’t worth the ten dollar discount you’re getting when compared to a first-party offering.

Plus, now that Sony and Immersion have finally made nice, you’re bound to see some Bluetooth gamepads incorporating both force feedback and tilty goodness in the very near future.

Philips unveils SPC620, SPC1000, and SPC1300 webcams at Computex


While we thought we’d already seen the crown jewel of webcams before, Philips apparently thinks otherwise, as it boasts quite heavily about its new trio of display-mountable cams that were unveiled at Computex. All three devices support background customization and emoticon integration, wide-angle lenses, and face-tracking capabilities. The SPC620 holds down the low-end with a vanilla VGA CMOS sensor and will run you €49.90 ($67), while the SPC1000 includes a directional microphone and noise reduction filter, two-megapixel sensor, and a 5x digital zoom for the very same price.

The €99.90 ($135) SPC1300 features Pixel Plus 2 technology seen in the company’s Flat TVs, a six-megapixel sensor, audio beaming system, twin directional microphones, and Digital Natural Motion technology that purportedly nixes any frame rate flickers when video chatting. All three webcams should hit shelves in Europe, America, and Asia this August.

[Via TechDigest]

Amtek shows off U560 UMPC at Computex


OEM manufacturer Amtek’s rolled into Computex with a fresh new UMPC prototype, and it looks like it may have already signed up a partner in the US to offer it under their brand name. That bit of news comes from GottaBeMobile, which has also managed to scope out a few of the device’s specs.

As is par for the course these days, the device is based on Intel’s McCaslin platform, and packs either an 800MHz A110 or 600MHz A100 processor, a 3600mAh 2-cell battery with an optional 4-cell extended battery, and an integrated 1.3 megapixel webcam, not to mention a full QWERTY keypad. Apparently, Amtek is set to put the device into mass production by the end of the year, although it looks like we’ll have to wait a bit longer to hear anything on pricing or availability, as well as any word about that mystery US partner.

World’s smallest (7-inch) HDTV on display at Computex

We don’t know why, but in a game where numbers are king we bring you the world’s smallest HDTV. Measuring in at just 7-inches, Xceive’s “Breckenridge” reference design is currently on display at Computex in Taipei. Unfortunately, Xceive is only showing off their XC5000 silicon tuner in the press release, but we’ve got a sneaking suspicion that they’re using that SanyoSeiko-Epson 7.1-inch, 1080p-capable LCD panel (pictured) first floated back in October. Xceive’s contribution to the 16:9 HDTV is the crazy small, 2.75 x 4.75-inch main board capable of receiving all 18 ATSC formats or NTSC signals via terrestrial or cable implementations. Unfortunately, you’ll have to sit about 6-inches away from the display for all those pixels to matter. Still, it is just a reference design. In other words, Xceive is looking for someone with the manufacturing skills to take this to market. Sammy, Sony, Philipps… any takers? Read-on to peep the XC5000 chip just for kicks.